Cellular Signal Boosters Help Keep Communication Available During Weather Emergencies

By Anil Sharma November 06, 2012

Wilson Electronics, highlighting the importance of cellular signal boosters, claimed that boosters can provide a lifeline during weather emergencies.

Wilson Electronics, a major player in the wireless communications industry for more than 40 years, designs and manufactures a wide variety of cell phone signal boosters, antennas and related components that significantly improve cellular communication in mobile, indoor, and machine-to-machine (M2M) applications.

"Cellular networks are a resilient and redundant communications option available to the general public," said Joe Banos, COO for US-based booster manufacturer Wilson Electronics, in a statement.

"So phones and other cellular devices can be a critical communications link during weather-related emergencies," said Banos.

Officials with Wilson Electronics said that signal boosters can help users by providing a more reliable signal in weak-signal areas. They also help by accessing a signal from a more distant tower should nearby towers get knocked out of service by extreme weather conditions.

While first responders commonly employ signal boosters in their vehicles to ensure reliable data transfer, private citizens use in-vehicle boosters to eliminate dead zones in urban, suburban and rural areas.

Company officials pointed out that signal boosters' value are storm-proven. Signal boosters aided the clean up and recovery efforts following Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

Although cellular service in New Orleans had been knocked out by the storm, utility vehicles working to restore power were able to access signals from more distant undamaged towers across Lake Pontchartrain to help coordinate repair work.

Earlier this month, Wilson Electronics announced its latest line of 4G indoor signal boosters built to improve voice and data communications in buildings with the weak cellular signal.

These multi-band boosters amplify signals for devices operating on AT&T, Verizon Wireless or T-Mobile 4G networks, as well as signals on the legacy networks of all North American cellular service providers.

Benefits of these boosters include fewer dropped connections and no-service “dead zones,” faster data transfer rates and improved battery life for cellular device users inside buildings with these boosters installed.

Edited by Brooke Neuman

IoTevolutionworld Contributor

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