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Inmarsat and the IoT

By Chrissie Cluney August 30, 2017

Is your energy company concerned about whether it is successfully deploying Internet of Things (IoT) technology to drive innovation, efficiency, and increased productivity?

Inmarsat, a provider of global mobile satellite communications services, has completed independent research. The company has found that while the vast majority of energy companies have their sights set on IoT, a significant proportion of companies lack the skills needed to take advantage of the technology.

The company enlisted market research specialist company Vanson Bourne. This company interviewed respondents from 100 large energy companies across the globe.

What were their findings? Vanson Bourne found that while 88 percent of companies expect to deploy IoT technologies within the next two years, many currently lack the skills needed to do so effectively. Over a third (35 percent) of respondents said that they lack the management skills to make the most of the IoT. While 43 percent lack the skills to do so at a delivery level. 53 percent of respondents said that they would benefit from additional skills at a strategic level to take full advantage of the IoT.

“Whether they work with fossil fuels or renewables, IoT offers energy companies the potential to streamline their processes and reduce costs in previously unimagined ways. Smart sensors, for example, can facilitate the collection of information at every stage of production, enabling them to acquire a higher level of intelligence on how their operations are functioning and to therefore work smarter, more productively and more competitively. But fully realising these benefits depends on energy companies’ access to appropriately-skilled members of staff and it is clear from our research that there are considerable skills gaps in the sector at all stages of IoT deployment,” said Chuck Moseley, senior director for energy, Inmarsat Enterprise.

Is there a shortage of skillsets in cyber security and technology in energy companies? Inmarsat examined the specific IoT skillsets that energy companies are lacking. The research found that 54 percent have a shortage in cyber security personnel and 49 percent lack skills in technical support, while analytical and data science skills are also in high demand. 

“IoT is set to have a similarly transformative effect on a whole swathe of industries, so it’s likely that the pressure on skills will only increase. Energy companies who currently lack these capabilities in-house will find themselves in a heated recruitment battle for this talent, with Silicon Valley in particular offering an attractive alternative,” said Moseley.

Inmarsat is not only assisting its customers with providing them with global mobile satellite communications services, but also with research that will allow companies to be profitable.




Edited by Ken Briodagh
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